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How To Handle Post-Hurricane Conditions

ORANGE BEACH, AL - SEPTEMBER 18: The remains of a collapsed building sit on the beach September 18, 2004 in Orange Beach, Alabama. Workers and residents continue to clean up after the Hurricane Ivan touched down on the Gulf Coast early Thursday morning. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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When a hurricane blows through, it could wreak havoc on the local area. Not everyone can leave, vacating to another location. If you have to stay behind, have a game plan to stay safe, hydrated and fed. The following are five ways to improve your post-hurricane conditions.

1. Know Where To Locate Help

The city is likely to set up stations with water, food and decontamination showers. These resources are often put in a central location where heavy devastation occurred. Be sure to seek them out, reporting that you are still within the city limits.

Water could be shut off to avoid contamination concerns. Gather supplies and take advantage of the shower station. Microbes spread when storms blow through. Protect yourself from possible infection and illness by staying clean.

2. Keep a Stock on Non-Perishable Foods

Supply lines may be hindered, making it hard for stores to receive food, and restaurants may not have water or electricity. Keep drinking water as much as possible. Have a stock of non-perishable products that offer nourishment, such as protein bars, fruit cups and jerky. Be careful of sodium levels as they could dehydrate you.

Keep in mind that you may not have access to plates, cups and silverware. Individual, pre-packaged items allow for less trash and make for easier consumption.

3. Have a Generator

During recovery, run your air conditioner and fridge with a generator system. This electrical device offers some comfort as you wait for utility restoration. With anything, be sure to use it appropriately, reading through the generator directions carefully.

4. Cell Chargers and Battery Backups

Keeping contact with others offers security and connection, but traditional cell batteries are unlikely to last for a week. Instead, rely on a solar charger system or have additional cell batteries available. Using these means, you won’t have to pull energy from the generator.

The after-effects of a storm are sometimes harder than the gale itself. Get ahead by planning. Know where your resources may be and have supplies on hand,