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The Importance of Rear Entry Ramp for Vehicles

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Rear entry conversion vehicles are designed with a folding rear entry ramp integrated into the rear cargo area. This design allows the floor plan of the car to remain essentially unchanged. In addition, the foldable rear entry ramp makes entry and exit easy for larger wheelchairs or passengers with special needs. In some cases, this type of ramp may even allow for an extra passenger in a wheelchair. These benefits make rear entry conversion vehicles great for a wide driveway or garage.

Side-entry conversions allow for curbside parking.

Using a side-entry conversion is common to make a wheelchair-accessible van easier to park. These conversions allow wheelchair users to sit in the driver’s or passenger’s seat, with enough space for storage. Curbside parking is made easier thanks to the side-entry ramp’s low inside floor. They are also more comfortable for wheelchair users because the wheelchair passenger’s seat is placed far away from the wheel wells. A side-entry van allows for curbside parking and can accommodate five ambulatory passengers. You can find these Wheelchair Vans For Sale – FreedomMotors.

Side-entry vans are often pricier than rear-entry conversions, requiring more modifications. While these conversions allow for curbside parking, they can also be more challenging to park. The wheelchair ramp may not be available in the parking lot, so it’s best to consider where you’ll be parking before deciding. Side-entry conversions can be difficult to park on a sidewalk or in a crowded parking lot. Still, they allow wheelchair users to drive the vehicle from a wheelchair or any position within the car.

Rear-entry conversions allow for in-vehicle parking.

While side-entry conversions have limitations in parking, rear-entry modifications allow you to park in any available spot. The downside is that they can make parallel parking a challenge, but the benefits of rear-entry vans outweigh this advantage. Additionally, rear-entry conversions allow wheelchair users to remain in the center of the van, where the attendant can sit next to them.

A rear-entry conversion makes it possible to park the wheelchair in any parking space. This feature is handy if you don’t have a designated accessible parking space. Unfortunately, many parking lots do not have enough space for handicapped vehicles, and only about 10-20% of them have special “hash marks” for extended side ramps. In addition, the government does not differentiate between regular cars and WAVs when issuing handicap license plates. As a result, rear-entry conversions are great for many situations.

Rear-entry conversions are more affordable.

Rear entry ramps for vehicles are more practical and flexible in many places. Side-entry conversions are difficult to park and have limited parking space. Rear-entry ramps can fit into nearly any space, and they do not require additional length or width for loading or unloading. Rear-entry conversions can parallel-park within a city street and out-of-town curbs. They also retain their impressive ground clearance, making them more reliable in snow-covered parking lots.

Rear-entry conversions are more affordable than powered side-entry versions. Consumers save up to $12,000 or more on a conversion by purchasing used vehicles with new modifications. “This can be a cost-effective option for people with mobility challenges,” says Diana Conte, AMS Vans’ vice president of business development. She estimates that her company buys and converts around 800 used minivans a year.

Side-entry conversions require a more expansive driveway or garage

A side-entry garage requires a broader driveway than a standard one. If you plan to install a side-entry ramp, you’ll need to widen your driveway by eight feet. Also, you’ll need to provide enough room for your cars to make a 90-degree turn. To ensure a smooth transition from the garage to the side-entry ramp, you should build a more expansive driveway.

A standard two-car side-entry garage requires a minimum of 24 feet of backup space and 18 feet of width. On the other hand, single-car side-entry garages can fit into a driveway as narrow as twelve feet wide. However, side-entry garages have a very sharp turning radius, which is difficult for most vehicles.

Read More: How a Local Auto Dealer Can Help You Choose the Right Vehicle

Rear-entry conversions are easier to drive.

While rear-entry conversions are the norm for accessible minivans, they are not without their own set of limitations. For example, a wheelchair user cannot drive a rear-entry minivan because parallel parking is impractical. This is because the wheelchair passenger must either exit the vehicle on the road or get out of the car to enter the roadway. The only alternative for parallel parking a rear-entry van is to park on the other side of the street. This would give the wheelchair user access to the ramp and make driving a rear-entry minivan much easier.

One of the most significant advantages of rear-entry conversions is the cost. This type of conversion costs less than half of a side-entry van. They are also easier to park and easier to drive. However, the lower cost comes with some trade-offs. Rear-entry conversions are also not recommended for wheelchair users because they are less accessible and can be challenging to park.

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